Every Nigerian Needs Therapy

Adebayo Adeniran
6 min readJan 3, 2023

Years of failed policies have taken its toll on the happiest people on earth.

Ayanfe Olarinde via Unsplash

It is December.

Fuel scarcity has been raging for well over a month.

At times like these, you see long queues in and around petrol stations, with people shouting at the top of their voices at the station attendants and each other to purchase petrol (or gas as Americans would call it) to drive their cars and run their generators.

For the local touts and thugs, known in local parlance as the Agberos, fuel Scarcity is heaven sent; an opportunity for them to put their street wisdom to use in outsmarting a system which has never loved and shafted them at every turn.

They do this by generating large jerry cans out of thin air and buying the scarce commodity at the standard rate, only to sell the same product to those who cannot afford to spend their time waiting in those long, interminable queues.

And right before our very eyes, the serially exploited has become a master at exploiting his fellow citizens.

It is two months to the elections.

There are three major candidates vying to become the next president of the Federal Republic of Nigeria.

One of them is the former governor of the commercial capital of the nation — Lagos state.

It is often said that Lagos state is the fifth largest economy in Africa.

The former governor since the expiration of his tenure in 2007 has adroitly filled every strategic position in state government with his cronies.

His wife until quite recently was senator. His daughter is the head of all market women in Lagos, a position which is crucial to securing the votes of all the women who operate market stalls. And his son is in charge of all the uber lucrative advertising boards in the city.

Our protagonist selects who gets to become governor. And if you are stupid enough to pursue an agenda contrary to his, your political demise is all but guaranteed.

Given the size of the Lagos economy and its extraordinary commercial viability, you would be forgiven for thinking that there would be a plethora of public schools and hospitals catering to the needs of…

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Adebayo Adeniran

A lifelong bibliophile, who seeks to unleash his energy on as many subjects as possible